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for europe. the european union collect the nobel peace prize in oslo. >> the thousands of jobs under threat. carmaker opel halts production at one of its biggest plants in germany. >> and will he or won't he -- mario monti's back and forth on resignation casts uncertainty over italy's economic and political future. >> we begin the show with what has been a day of celebration for the european union. >> the three senior figures representing the eu have been in the norwegian capital, oslo, to collect the nobel peace prize. it was awarded to the 27-member bloc for six decades of promoting peace, democracy, and human rights. >> however, not everyone is happy. some have asked whether the price is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial -- the prize is justified at that time when the eu is mired in economic and financial crisis. desmond tutu says it is an organization based on military force. >> coveted award was accepted with pride by the eu's 3 president, martin schulz, herman van rompuy, and jose manuel barroso. the standing ovation they received was a rare accolad
. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne
state to pass right to work laws for private and public workers unions bitterly oppose. michigan governor rick snyder is expected to sign the bills on tuesday. >> i view this as solving an issue for michigan workers. we have hard-working people in michigan. this is about giving workers choice. david: what does all this mean for the workers, for businesses and for the unions? joining us is michigan state senator patrick kulbec. thanks for coming in. i appreciate it. let's say what right to work laws are not. they not about outlawing unions. a lot of union workers have said, these right to work laws would outlaw, they're only about not forcing people to pay the unions if people don't want to, right? >> that's exactly it. collect tiff bargaining still stays in place. all we're talking about is giving workers a choice whether or not they want to financially compensate a union via union deals. david: why do you think the bills are necessary? >> for me we looked at the state of michigan and only state in the nation that lost population in the last census. i went off and did analysis an
union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, w
-to-work state. thousands of protesters and union members converged on the capitol in lansing yesterday to object to the measure that would bar unions from requiring workers to pay membership dues and to join the union. governor snyder signed the measure into law. >> shouldn't the unionsing putting out a proposition that workers want to join a union? and shouldn't workers feel free to make that choice to say their dollars are going to the union or not based on they feel they're getting results? so that's what this is really doing. so that's why i view this as pro-worker, not anti-union. >> the right-to-work clause regarded as a big blow to organized labor which has seen membership decline across the country. down to private sector 7%. >> you think overall, isn't it, 7%? more than 50% of those work for the government. >> 7% and more than that if you go up, like -- i think it's 16% if you include -- 13 if you include public, which is -- where it is. a contentious issue. they point to what happened in indiana. you know, more jobs, better -- better economy -- >> i think the -- >> the right-to-work st
. >> one key part of the plans is the creation of a banking union. finance ministers were supposed to be discussing the first steps to building such a union today, but the talks collapsed without progress. the discussions are very contentious, mainly because of the devolution of national powers to brussels. our correspondent has been following the talks and explained why they collapsed. >> another meeting on this next question, another failure. basically, the differences between member states were not healed. on the one side, you've got germany being very questioning about the central core idea, which is that the european central bank will become the supervisory body for the whole euro banking area, insuring heavy capitalization of banks to bolster them against future economic shocks. germany does not think that is necessarily the right body to do it. it certainly does not think that all 6000 banks in europe should be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking,
ministers will try to come to an agreement on the eu banking union, but deep revisions remain. >>> house republicans put forward their plan to cut the u.s. deficit, but the proposal is quickly dismissed by democrats and the white house. >>> and australia central bank cuts interest rates to the lowest level since the financial crisis in a bid to get ahead of sluggish commodities demand. we're on tuesday and off to a slightly, what, soft close yesterday for european stocks. right now we're pretty evenlies passed, advancers just about outpacing decliners on the stoxx 600, but not by much, 5:4 if that. so one hour into the trading session, this is where we stand. the ftse 100 just flat, a flat close yesterday. the dax was essentially fairly flat yesterday. up just ten points. the cac 40 yesterday doing a little bit better, up 0.2%. first pointing out ftse up 9 out of the last 11. we have seen yields continue to decline in spain. just 5.23%, but still capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar i
and believed that strong unions are the foundation of a strong middle class. when union membership was at its peak in this country, we all grew together. the middle class grew and prospered. everyone from the richest c.e.o. to the minimum wage worker benefited from our nation's prosperity when labor union organization was at its peak. michigan's economy has always been a shining examples of that shared prosperity. when an auto worker who put in a hard day's work could earn enough not only to buy one of the cars he made but to buy a house, send his kids to college, take a nice vacation, have a good retirement, live the american dream. as unions have declined in this country, the middle class is also declined. those at the top earn more and more, while ordinary working people are seeing the american dream slip out of touch. and it's not just union workers who are losing ground. because unions don't just benefit their members. they benefit each and every american worker, regardless of whether you've ever held a union card. it is unions that fought for all of the things that we sort of take for g
to go into world war ii, when to speak with the union, and he said, look, we have realizes that if you're a does not sustain free enterprise, the united states cannot gain free enterprise itself. so if you're looking for a motive for this, that is really what it comes back to. >> is there something distinctive about the american state the positions it to do this? of the states occurred in the wind. >> you really have to understand this historically because if you ask the question of globalization being inevitable and you looked at the first half of 20th-century, it looked like it was impossible. you have empires that are fragmenting globalization. have two world wars. yet the oppression. in the question by the second world war is, is globalization at all possible? can you have a global capitol system? and it was only made possible because the american state had a specific capacity to take that on some specific capacities and the interest because you have to remember that after the first world war the u.s. was already a dominant economic power in the world by far. industrial power. alre
discussions here, especially on the outline we put forward, show that the christian democratic union is a foundation for a strong germany, a journey in which everyone gets a fair chance -- a germany in which everyone gets a fair chance. >> the party has rallied behind her ahead of next year's election, including traditional conservatives who have been could assert -- critical of her positions at times. >> we would be foolish not to take advantage of the recognition that the chancellor and joyous -- chancellor enjoys. >> the party did make some changes to the line up behind the chancellor with a re- shuffle of the executive board. >> there are a lot of new faces, women, people with immigrant backgrounds. i am happy that our party is now more reflective of our country's diversity. >> chancellor merkel can rest assured that her party is behind her. even before the campaign begins in earnest, she will have our hands full with the eurozone debt crisis and other problems -- have her hands full with the eurozone debt crisis and other problems. >> protesters clashed with mohamed morsi's supp
to wen a thermonuclear war with the soviet union long after there isn't one. we are still protecting germany, italy, england, and austria from staalin and his successors even though they are now strong enough to meet a threat which in fact doesn't exist. i just had my very able aid marcus rose check this for me. over the last ten years we have spent $3.8 billion in medicare. that's true. during that same period we spent $5.6 billion on the military. the military has been going up fast faster and it includes an awful lot of expenditure, unnecessary. we're reading today that canada is recoring whether they're going to buy the f-35. the f-35 is a very, very well conceived airplane that's proving to be a great financial disaster. if any agency, the decht housing, the department of education, the department of energy, had a disaster as remotely expensive to the taxpayer as the f-35 my conservative friends would be screaming. so yeah, i agree with them. ironically. that's one area where the republicans want to spend more, where mitt romney criticizes the president for not spending enough.
about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to
organizations, organized people into unions in a way that we never had before or since. that was the greatest wave of unionization the united states ever seen. in the depths of the depression. think about the difference between then and now. in the depths of the depression millions of americans decided they wanted to join a union and they did so on a scale we had never had before or since. the second big organization was the socialist party's and the third was the american communist party who were coordinated with the cio and the joint membership and so on. very powerful organizations parallel to what you have in europe but after the war everything changed. if i could take a moment to explain why. roosevelt comes to power, the depression is underway three years, he runs on a balanced budget proposal, he gets into office and everyone tells him the economic crisis is worse than anything they have ever seen which is clearly true. they don't know what to do and it is getting worse. something has to be done. this might have been an interesting conversation but there are also people marching in the
opened in the 1990 costs at a time when the russians were in the wake of the union. there was a movement to end secrecy and discussed the past. this came from the ground up, and people at the top supported it. the archives began to open in the 1990's and in some ways were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2002 and became president of russia, -- in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military
union over the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. they talk about the u.s. health care system and later the house transportation committee hearing on high speed rail. on tomorrow's woo journal, u.s. news and world report business correspondent rick newman on the november jobs report. and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy and infect use disease directer and cbc directer thomas. washington journal begins live each morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >>> chief of staff had to make the plan for the innovation of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that the land would cost 700 men with 250,000 -- be at the bko and 500,000 to be named. >>> as harry truman's grandson somebody in the middle. i have to -- i choose to honor both. both the sacrifice and sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and i have a little girl like? who died as a result of the atomic bombing. it's unimaginable what that must have been like to be close to that to the hype center where that fire ball originated in the bla
, in the meantime, we can talk about how this banking union might work out in the long run. but my guess is it will take a long time yet before they reach an agreement on banking union because this agreement, this minimal agreement but important agreement took many hard sessions to even wrestle out a compromise like this. so i think banking union is fine. >> silvia wadhwa, thank you very much for following that for us into the wee hours of the morning. joining us for more on what this means for the market is paris annan from fidelities investment. we wake up to this news. it's significant. as you look into 2013 and you start to look at why european equities are going in general, how does thi change if at all your views? >> well, when we think about the outlook for on 2013, you could almost separate it into two outlooks. you have the outlook for the macro economy and the politics in the euro crisis and the outlook for making money in the european shares. with things likes the eu banking supervision and even the change in italian politics, what we're seeing more generally is that these eve
, the provision of the things that in other industrialized democracies, the model in which you have a union bargaining with a big capitalist firm and you come to this internal social contract for the employees. right? we work for you and get things like health care and retirement and security and other things. now this relationship of employment is coming tomorrow a start. one of the things that you can do is go to the model that it is a provision of the state and that would lessen the blow to the content jent workers. >> and that would be an outgrowth that the model has been so incredibly profitable. it's resulted in gains for investors and for companies. there's a lot of money on the table to be used to create the kind of dynamic social safety net. the problem is we've sort of let it stay off the table in term of revenue and we can afford to provide the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companie
of communism substantiated then by the evil empire of the soviet union and the west, in his purgatory letter to his children, which had been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he saw the concentrated evil of our time. now, he looked with kindred eyes upon the enormity of communism. indeed, conservatives of all stripes could agree about that hideous this of the communist system, which is why the world of the cold war was, in many ways, a tidier, more manichean world than the one that we inhabit. whatever else might be said about it, the soviet union provided a sort of negative rallying point, something that conservatives of all sorts could define themselves against, and i wonder about today, what about today, how do conservatives to find themselves. well, that is a question that i hope the panel is going to conjure with. before i turn things over to them, i want to make just briefly to final points. one of which is -- has been raised a couple of times. if conservatives were virtually at one in regarding the freedom biking etiology of parmesan with repugnance, they were not, i
, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. proposed each country allow the other country's reconnaissance plane to fly overhead to detect preparations for a sneak attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed to like the
time included members of labor unions, farm groups and civil rights organizations. included representative not just of the medical profession but of the people who need it and use health care. a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. she was a member of the women's auxiliary of the steelworkers organizing committee, spending her days working in communities around the steel mills. greenberg told the audience at the national health conference that she had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just steps away from the comfortable headquarters of the american medical association, tenements, a 6 chicago where people struggled with terrible health conditions related to poverty and unemployment and struggled to obtain basic medical care. greenberg told the conference of the grossly overcrowded county hospital, the city's only public hospital with local describes as a death house, a single overcrowded private hospital served the entire african-american community of the south side. chicago's outpatient clinics
due to meet in a last-ditch paem attempt to agree on union supervisor. the timetable for implementing reforms are seen as main sticking points. germany's reluctance to hand over supervision of all of its banks to the ecb. france wants the central bank to have ultimate responsibility. that's not to mention demands from the u.k., sweden, and the netherlands which makes us have stuart richardson, still with us, whether the banking union thing's going to happen. if so, when? >> i think the move toward some sort of banking union is in progress here. it has been -- european, a work in progress. so it would appear that sweden was coming out of thing yesterday, the dave before -- day before, they're not backing the full union. germany wants limited banking union. >> does it matter -- how urgently do we need this in place? >> i think it's one of the key issues that needs to be resolved within the whole european project such as fiscal and political union. i think that the -- if they're going do it, they might as well do it right. as an investor, to me it's not that important for the next one or
with more. i would think it would be a hot commodity. >> reporter: here is the interesting thing. union intransigence helped kill the twinkie and the paragon of junk food may be brought back to life by one of the most hated union foes of all, walmart. reports are walmart is looking at the body parts of the neb did hostess brand. 40 percent of hostess we sales. turnkeys, hellos, ding-dongs, and of the delights. here is how delicious it might be. closing doors after mark -- last month. needed to reduce $100 million per year in retiree health costs. over half of it going to people who never worked at hostess. forcing the company to run to separate fleets, now they're looking at buying a pieces. mostly brands without the union plans and some 18,000 workers, most union employees. now comes walmart, object of union's corn for years. protesters descended on stores to pick over workers having to serve shoppers on thanksgiving night, never mind that more union people than actual walmart employees are protesting. never mind the unions don't represent walmart workers, but they would love to. think
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
which until this election was a predominantly republican-voting phenomena, and those in union city, new jersey, um, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. and a lot of that dose to who en-- goes to who engaged them when they showed up and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time in those communities. so i think there's a lot to be said for viewing the influence of latinos in this cycle and particularly going forward as part of a broader coalition. um, and one that, you know, i've heard time and time again everybody likes, republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national exit polls this year shouldn't give you a lot of comfort. >> right. >> it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion rights, 60% support for the affordable care act. um, the almost 59% support for same-sex marriage. those are, this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound particularly socially conservative to me. >> no. >> so -- >> and, and also the question i think at some
of presidential power to union and civil rights leader who came to office after free elections in 1990. the commission's confirm the prosecutors fears. the body was found in the wrong grade. the identity of the body in his grave has yet to be revealed, but investigators say they know who it is. in the meantime, a second burial was held in warsaw. >> the family was not present when the body was identified. mistakes are always possible. i can only express my deepest sympathy with the family. now they have to cope with the exhumation and second burial. >> he does not have a clue. he lies morning, noon, and night. we are fed up with the allies. >> for the first time in years, the civic platform is the longer the strongest party. >> a mass grave would have been better. many of the dead were beyond recognition. a symbolic of what have been better. this is a very sensitive dispute for poland. it cannot be resolved discreetly. the politicians are using it for their purposes while the families suffer. >> some say one case may have been more painful than the others because the person in the wron
union. after all, we would be the beneficiary. >> the volunteers are being prepared for guerrilla warfare. support from behind the lines for 3000 strong in african forces. military intervention has not been decided on yet. peaceful options are still being explored in order to prevent civilians being caught in the crossfire. >> and the reporter was in mali until a few days ago before they joined us in kenya. we asked if military intervention could end the conflict in northern mali. >> it may take quite some time. until now, there has not been a clear vote from the security council in the united nations. the 3300 soldiers of the west african countries that are supposed to be stationed there are still not ready. the military advisers that the european union wants to send will not be here until the beginning of next year. training will come some months and then come the rainy season where military operations will be very difficult so it could take another six months until military operations' move ahead. this is enough time for the islamists to dig in on their positions. >> the u.s. g
on election 2012. >>> thanks for watching "state of the union." if you missed us, search itunes for state of the union. >>> this is "gps." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i am fareed zakaria i can't. we'll take you around the world today starting with egypt. the nation has erupted. we'll explain what the power struggle between the president and the courts means for the rest of the arab world and the world at large. >>> then china's new leaders. we know their names but who are they and what can we expect from them. is this china's gorbachev or will he take a hard line? >>> finally, the black swan, a best seller some say prediktsd the economic crisis. its author on his fascinating new book. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous,
, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> the fine stalinism. >> stalinism was developed system,-- define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any k
create jobs but opponents insist it's about busting the unions. we'll get into that. >>> plus the president and the leader of the house of representatives got together over the weekend to talk about the looming fiscal cliff, just three weeks away. after the it was over, this one didn't belly ache about that one and that one didn't belly ache about this one, so what did they do? how did that go? from the journalists at fox news, this is the monday fox report. ...and this, dancing in their heads... ...we have these. home depot gift cards. give the gift of doing, in-store or online. >> shepard: the white house says president obama believes he can cut a deal with house republicans to keep from all going over the fiscal cliff. the president is refusing to compromise on letting tax cuts expire on incomes of more than $250,000 a year. g.o.p. leaders are calling that a job killer and a deal breaker. of course, if we fall off the fiscal cliff, we'll all die, right? actually, taxes will go up for pretty much everybody and automatic spending cuts kick in on knew year's day. the president
, a bombshell in the legal battle between the lawmakers in one state and their teachers' union. >>> plus, the woman best known for running "vogue" magazine now reportedly being considered as our ambassador toening land. >> i need 10 or 15 skirts. >> what kind of skirts? >> please bore someone else with your skirts. >> don't ask miranda anything. [ loud party sounds ] hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. ♪ megyn: an early christmas gift for the young sons of two american heros. watch this. it happened at carollton elementary in virginia. two local military vets returning from overseas, both surprising their kids on the same day. >> mommy! [applause] >> give me a hug, man. [applause] i love you, man. >> i love you too. i missed you. megyn: that's so great. kindergartener malcolm wright reuniting with his dad over lunch after the boy overcame the shock of it, and the third grader clinging to mom. sh
. how the unions get in there. >> andreson was a lot more clear. >> he's great. >> great job by andrew. make sure to join us tomorrow. that's it for us. "squawk on the street" is next. >>> all right. with that, good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. we'll continue to monitor what jamie dimon does at the deal mark conference. we await the federal reserve statement, and news conference in just a few hours. as for europe, some green arrows, despite a miss in the eurozone in production this morning. >> the road map starts this morning with, of course, the fed. expectations for revamped bond buying program. what will the economic forecast say about next year and what to make of the "wall street journal" story that says academics are driving monetary policy at secret dinners in switzer land. >> more counteroffers in the debt negotiations. it looks like corporate taxes are part of the deductions. >> costco beats by 2 cents, better sales and better sales and membership fees. >> some more reports about apple tv today. the journal said it's designing a high -- new hig
than just roofless capitalism strong labor unions of course tax rates of the top and then a second era of financial capitalism, deregulation and capitalism and there's a widespread belief to talk to people. it explores the growth and the higher efficiency that must make everybody better off and it's not true. growth was slower in the second half and because the big instance stopped being spread to the general population or went to a handful of people at the top. the archetype is that they are actually setting it too low. it's not the 1 percent, it is the .1% for people that needed and in the earlier period, paul was absolutely right in the earlier period the quintile, every group in the population was growing but the bottom part was growing faster than the top. today it is not that way. gdp doesn't really give you a good measure of what is happening through the economy and the society. so, while that one-tenth of 1 percent has been doing very well, the median income is lower than it was a decade and a half ago. it is as low as it was two decades ago to go to the top. so, it's clear tha
states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and come back ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say economy you are talking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productivity. a 2010 study show that americans felt refreshed and better about their jobs coming back it is important to take breaks throughout the work die. >> i center to tell you, i don't think i had a year where i used up all of my vacation. most of us love our jobs enough that we are working into our vacation time all of the time. >> absolutely . that's what makings the united states so great. we like to work. tom brady and payton man aaron rodgers don't want to leave the field or lose their jobs. why would we mess with something
union. it changes every six months and it has been held by cyprus since july. ireland, since the bailout, they have won praise for their austerity measures. nearly half of what was spent when ireland last held the ball in 1940. switching gears to formula one. >> the german driver has been on a nonstop promotional blitz since being crowned the august for the crown champion. >> he has taken some time off to reflect on his latest achievement. >> finally, a formula one world champion is getting some much deserved a rest and recuperation. he is taking stock of what was a very turbulent and, at times, emotional season. and all came down to a certain strength. >> it is such a long season to start with. a difficult start, everything that could happen happened. everything that could go wrong did. i said we have to keep pushing and fighting until the end. if we do that, from deep inside us until the end, we cannot fail. >> the champion took an extended victory tour wowing fans across europe, but his first stop was the party are at rebel headquarters. he knows that seymour can trust are key compone
as early as tomorrow. what is the president owe labor unions at this point? you know, off the election, off of a win in michigan? how hard does he need to push this? >> i don't think he -- he is thinking he owes them a ton, but this is an threat to labor. this is a violent attack on the right to organize. it's much more radical than what was attempted in wisconsin or ohio. labor is flipping out, understandably so, and i think they're trying to stop snyder who may have wandered into a fight that is more extreme than he ever intended to. >> obama ultimately does -- i mean, if this is an easy way to keep your base close, he needs his base close if is he going to cut some sort of deal that are going to be unhappy with some part of ultimately. >> and also, if is he going to be continuing this campaign style strategy of taking his priorities out to the american public using grass rights networks to get support for them, whether that's immigration reform or maybe energy reform. he has to keep some out of the progressive network intact. the election and recent polling shows that the tide of public
to push through this right to work. >> this is interesting actually. michigan is a heavily unionized state so why would it be going right to work. there's enormous downward pressure on wages on american companies around the world that can make things cheaper elsewhere than here and our wages are uncompetitive in a lot of ways. in effect what people in michigan have to decide, do you want fewer jobs at higher wages or lower jomore jobs at lower w they have decided they want more jobs. >> you look at michigan and detroit, that's a pretty easy answer. >> the unemployment rate. >> the unemployment rate is horrible. detroit in 1960, i think, was one of the wealth nest city if not the wealthiest city in america and now one of the poorest. >> the fourth largest. >> this is a done deal, going through the house today, to a republican governor and says he will sign it. >> it's symbolic of two things, one, the politics of it all, what we've seen in wisconsin and elsewhere and the unpopularity of unions these days and secondly an economic phenomenon, basically a statement we want jobs and we're willin
the soviet union was then had reached a kind of height. there was a sort of -- of stalinism and stalinism was created throughouthroughou t the 1920s and 30s and then it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with a clinical theory and an economic theory and a clear ideology. it was exactly at this moment when the red army marched into central europe and began imposing a system on the central european stage. you can see how from scratch, what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important to do first and how did they try to. c-span: where did they get the rights to march into eastern europe? >> guest: they were the victors in the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941 and a font back against the germans and they kept going to berlin. c-span: defines stalinism. >> guest: stalinism was a developed system as i say in it was a system of complete control. the stalinist state believed he could control everything. he could control not only politics and not only economics but it could control social life and it could contro
in belfast, after the city council voted to fly the british flag the union flag, over city hall, just 17 days a year. instead of every day. the violence sent two officers to the hospital. street people were arrested. people in northern ireland remain deeply divided between the unionists who want to remain part of the united kingdom, and those who want to become part of the republic of rirld rirlirela. the storm hitting southern island now. least 27 people are dead. tens of thousands in evacuations centers, more than 50,000. fears it could be devastating as the storm that killed more than 1200 people last year. >>> well, italy a painting by leonardo da vinci stolen decades ago has been returned. taken from naples back in 1940. it made its way to the black market and went through switzerland, germany, the united states before ending up in a museum in japan. the museum agreed to return it to italy after hammering out a joint custody agreement. >>> well, when we come back, the pictures that caught our attention. don't miss that. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and tr
at where this argument goes coming out. one of the country's largest teachers unions is now coming under fire for using what one person called vicious and vile warfare to discuss the virtues of taxing the rich. we will play the video and debate what kind of message this ascending. >> the 1% said don't worry, this is good for you because it will trickle down from us to you. someday you will be rich and someday you will be rich and these rules will be your rules too. fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup inheir arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise
the other 22 languages of the european union. it struck me how amazing this. i'm sure millions of iranians are rushing to the west side of the european union to read the guidelines of human rights which clearly are having a great impact on their lives. one of the problems we are confronting -- it is a real problem -- you clearly both alluded to it -- we are confronted with a huge dilemma. we want to stop iran from having nuclear weapons and there is a widespread belief among policy makers that if you pursue a policy of support for democracy promotion inside iran at the same time, the regime will move away from negotiations. if we have to choose between depriving the regime of nuclear weapons or depriving the regime of its power inside the country, it is easier to achieve the former rather than the latter and it's better over all -- that we can live with an authoritarian iran without nuclear weapons and when we try to pursue a free iran, we might end up with an inimical nuclear-arms authoritarian iran. it is an understandable dilemma but it doesn't serve our purposes very well and we have n
cigarette. >> 700,000 citizens in the european union die prematurely because of tobacco. >> the proposal also includes an outright ban on menthol cigarettes. in the future, no artificial roma's will be allowed to mask the flavor. >> my aim here is that people can take an informed decision when they look at a pack of cigarettes, by getting the clear message that the product they buy harms. >> the proposal goes to the european council and european parliament, time the tobacco industry will no doubt use to try to snub it out. >> turning out to soccer, and no christmas cheer for shelf debt. they are out of the german cup. >> he had hoped to turn around the fortunes with his debut as head coach, but even a radical redesign on the starting lineup could not stave off the type play. the royal blues were behind on the half-hour marked. schalke rallied after the break. 15 minutes, and then leveled the score. the coach was sent to the stands after forcefully protesting a foul by schalke's jones. the turnaround was short-lived. they gave it one last go, but in the end, it went home with a spot in th
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